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Photo Credit: Forest & Kim Starr

image description

Photo Credit: Forest & Kim Starr

image description

Photo Credit: Forest & Kim Starr

image description

Photo Credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Rubus_hawaiensis#mediaviewer/File:Starr_030419-0032_Rubus_hawaiensis.jpg

QUICK FACTS

  • HPRWA SCORE
  • SYNONYMS Rubus damieni, Rubus hawaiiensis, Rubus hillebrandii, Rubus sandwicensis
  • ELEVATION RANGE Mid
  • FAMILY Rosaceae
  • PLANT TYPE Shrub|Large shrub-small tree
  • WATER REQUIRMENTS Requires regular water
  • SOIL REQUIRMENTS Tolerates many soil types
  • SUN EXPOSURE Full sun to Partial sun
  • SALT TOLERANCE Unknown
  • DRAINAGE REQUIRED Prefers saturated soil
  • PROPAGATION METHODS Seeds & Vegetative

Rubus hawaiensis
(Hawai`i blackberry, Hawaiian raspberry, kala, `kalakala)

These fruit-producing shrubs can grow 6 to 10 feet in height and are attractive to native birds for both their nectar and fruit. The fruit is commonly a bit bitter, but is often used to make pies and preserves that call for added sweetener. It is related to blackberry, and it is the only "pono" blackberry plant. In addition to being a native species, it has soft hairs instead of painful thorns, and does not invade natural areas. Kala is the Hawaiian name for pink, referring to the color of the juice of this native raspberry. Early Hawaiians used it to produce a pink to rose-colored dye for their kapa cloth. The two species of native raspberries are among the largest fruiting species in the world with sometimes two inch long berries. Joseph Rock, botanist, called them the "giant raspberry."

Plant Uses

  • Privacy-screening plant
  • Specimen
  • Ornamental
  • Medicinal
  • Cultural significance

Dangers

None